Sep 082012
 
Nana's Notes

Mabel Louise Hervey

We recently had the opportunity to look through a drawer of  ”memories” during a recent visit with Ruth’s uncle.   One of the treasures was a spiral notebook written by Ruth’s great grandmother, Mabel Louise Hervey (1863-1960), wife of George Rogers Wales and mother of Susan Hervey Wales Rollason.

The 30 plus pages of the spiral ring notebook start at her birth as Adelaide Francis Gifford, her adoptive family, Abraham and Elizabeth Boynton Hervey, her courtship and marriage to George and the birth of her children.    She remembers being stranded  in a snow storm on the train ride home from the Centennial celebration in Philadelphia in 1876, and much more.   Follow this link to read the Biographical Notes of Nana.

 Posted by at 10:48 pm  Tagged with:
Nov 222011
 
Kilborn Header1 copy

300 years ago this week (November 25, 1711) John Kilborn, one of the founders of Glastonbury, CT died.

Here lieth the body of Mr. Jn Kilborn, who died November y 25th 1711 in ye 60th year of His age.

According to a family history [1], John was instrumental in providing the land and building the parsonage for the first pastor, a requisite for establishing a new town.   His father and grandfather arrived in Connecticut in 1635 and were active leaders in Wethersfield, just across the Connecticut River.  John Kilbourn is buried at the Glastonbury Green Cemetery.

What makes this story special to our family is that my wife, Ruth, grew up just 10 miles southwest of Glastonbury in Middletown.   Until recently, however, she had no idea that one of her ancestors (her 7th great grandfather) had lived so near.  As we have traced her family history, her line goes to Greenville, Maine where Fred Templeton and Angie Stiles were married.  Angie was born in Amherst, Nova Scotia, where our story ended until the last few years.

What we discovered in 2004 was that the Stiles family, along with several of Angie’s other ancestors, were New England Planters, a group of 8,000 people from Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island who moved to Nova Scotia before the Revolution to claim offers of free land from the British.   After expelling the French-speaking Acadians, they were desperate for farmers to settle the lands.

A large group of these New England Planters came from the area around Hebron and Lebanon, Connecticut,  just 15-20 miles east of Glastonbury.  Among these were Nathan Stiles, Jr. and Kesiah Kilbourne, the great granddaughter of John.

The map outlines the chapters in this 300 year story.  As we learn more and more about the stories of vision, courage and struggles of our ancestors, I appreciate how deeply indebted we are to them in so many ways.

Click here for a larger view of the map.

 

1)  Kilbourn, Payne Kenyon, The Family Memorial: a History and Genealogy of the Kilbourn family in the United States and Canada from the Year 1635 to the Present Time, Hartford, Connecticut, Brown and Parsons, 1845 as accessed on Google Books.
Sep 232011
 
Canoes76

During our recent trip to Moosehead Lake, Maine, we visited the Moosehead Historical Society in Greenville Junction.    This was just a short walk from where Ruth’s mother grew up.   Following an excellent guided tour we stopped in the office to see what they might have about the Templeton family.   Several files!    One treasure was this clipping from the Moosehead Gazette, July  4, 1952 about Ruth’s grandfather, Fred Templeton.  The headline reads: “Fred Templeton Still Making Canoes at Age of 76 Years.”

In the story Fred recounts experiences from his years (1898 – 1945) as a guide at Kineo (see Memories from Kineo).   He remembers seeing as many as 84 moose in a day.  The last caribou he saw was in 1899.   He had other stories to tell, but he had to get back to work to finish the canoe.    Fred died on 9 Oct 1952, just four months after this interview.  Templeton canoes are still known in this part of Maine.

I am so happy that we found this article.  Thanks to organizations such as the Moosehead Historical Society for the work they do to preserve these memories.

Sep 132011
 
Kineo

 

Mt Kineo on Mooshead Lake, Maine

Today the weather was perfect as we took Ruth’s mother, Ruth Templeton Rollason, back to Kineo, an  island on Moosehead Lake in Maine where she lived all of her childhood summers.  The shuttle captain loaned us his golf cart so that we could see the island.  We had the best guide – Ruth’s mom – who reminisced about her 17 summers here.

Kineo was a destination resort from the 1850′s until the 1930′s.  In 1903 young Angie Stiles and her sister Martha came from Amherst, Nova Scotia to work at the Kineo Resort.   Fred Templeton was a guide for the guests who wanted to hunt and fish.  He also looked after the boats for families who summered here.

A year later Fred and Angie married in Greenville where they made their winter home.  When school was out, Fred and Angie took their family to Kineo for the summer.

Fred leased land on a small island where he built a modest summer cabin for his family.

Island in Kineo Cove where the Templeton family lived during the summer

The resort is long gone.  Today there is a public golf course, a state park, and many beautiful summer homes.