Nov 172011
 

Several weeks ago I posted about my ongoing search for more of the story of Emma (Emily) Sears Templeton Jenkins.  More detail on my search for Emma is found on this page which explains our search for the missing 53 years of of the story of my wife’s great grandmother.  One of the tasks I listed was to request the Social Security application for a Harry Templeton, who was living with an Emma Templeton in Waterville, Maine in the 1900 census.

A copy of Harry’s SS Application arrived in today’s mail.   Indeed Harry was a brother of Fred Templeton (my wife’s grandfather) since he lists his parents as Emma Sears and Frank Templeton.   The Emma living in Waterville, Maine is indeed Fred’s mother.

From his WWI Draft Registration card we know that he was living in Wyoming in 1918.  At the time of his Social Security application (1937) he was living in Sedona, AZ.  He died and was buried in Yavapai County Cemetery on November 13, 1968 according to records found at the website of the Sharlot Hall Museum in Prescott, AZ (www.sharlot.org).   There is no marker.

Another piece of the puzzle and a new member of the family.   We hope that we can learn more about Harry’s life.

Sep 222011
 

We just returned from a wonderful trip to Maine.  Last Thursday I went to the Maine State Archives and State Library looking for information about the Templeton Family, especially Fred and Hermon Templeton’s mother, Emily Sears.   The Templeton family lost contact with Emily after the death of her husband, John Frank Templeton in 1879.  What happened during her next 53 years?

I was very happy when I found her record of death in 1932.   I was even more delighted in finding an obituary in the Bangor Daily News.

Emily (Emma) Sears

However, like many puzzles: pieces found  and now new questions to ask.  I have laid out the story and questions in much greater detail on  a new page focused on her story.   This is the first time I knew that she spent some of her last few years in Bangor, Maine.   Her obituary says that she was the widow of Frank Jenkins.   That’s also new information.    That’s what makes these quests so interesting!

We also had a chance to visit her grave in very rural Willimantic in Piscataquis County, Maine and see this very tiny community where Ruth’s grandfather was born.

Sep 162011
 

Tomorrow we leave Moosehead Lake (Greenville, ME) to begin our journey home.   On Tuesday we traveled with Ruth’s mother to Kineo, where she told us about her experiences as a child living on the island each summer while her father worked as a guide (see Memories from Kineo).   On Wednesday we visited the Moosehead Historical Society in Greenville.  It has to be one of the best small town museums in America.  It was also great to find some newpaper clippings about the Templeton family.

On Thursday I went to Augusta to visit the Maine State Archives and State Library, making some progress, along with developing some new questions about what happened to Emily Sears Templeton after her husband, John Frank Templeton, died.   I will update this information when I get back home.

Today I visited cemeteries in Willimantic and Milo, both here in Piscataquis County.   Found the grave markers I was looking for. It was a great, memorable week with lots of pictures to process and information to organize and ponder.  It will be good, too, to get back to a warmer place.

Sep 092011
 

Today I added a page of what I know so far about my paternal grandfather, William Inhoff, who came as a 14 year old from Germany to Hardin County, Ohio.  In searching the ship’s list of passengers, I can’t find any family names that I recognize.  Could he have come alone?    I believe he came to Ohio to be with his aunt’s family.  From all that I have collected I am thinking that his home may have been in Schluechtern area of Hesse, northeast of Frankfort, Germany.

Last night I Googled on one of the related family names: Leibold in Hardin County.  I came across a book called Linking rings: William W. Durbin and the magic and mystery of America, by James D. Robenalt in 2004.   Only snippets were visible – but they proved interesting.  William Durbin’s mother was Margaret Leibold, b 1833 in Hintersteinau in Hesse.   Now to find a copy of the book!